Hand Painted Antique Style Greek Pottery Small Aryballos

27,50 

One small narrow-necked vessel or bottle shaped like a sphere, used in ancient Greece to store oil or perfume. Handmade and hand painted.
Dimensions: 7cm x 8cm

Description

One small narrow-necked vessel or bottle shaped like a sphere, used in ancient Greece to store oil or perfume. Handmade and hand painted.
Dimensions: 7cm x 8cm

 
Corinth under the Bacchiadae
Corinth had been a backwater in 8th-century Greece. The Bacchiadae (Ancient Greek: Βακχιάδαι Bakkhiadai), a tightly-knit Doric clan, were the ruling kinship group of archaic Corinth in the 8th and 7th centuries BC, a period of expanding Corinthian cultural power. In 747 BC (a traditional date) an aristocratic revolution ousted the Bacchiad kings, when the royal clan of Bacchiadae, numbering perhaps a couple of hundred adult males, took power from the last king, Telestes. They dispensed with kingship and ruled as a group, governing the city by electing annually a prytanis, who held the kingly position for his brief term, no doubt a council (though none is specifically documented in the scant literary materials) and a polemarchos to head the army.
During Bacchiad rule, from 747 to 650 BC, Corinth became a unified state. Large scale public buildings/monuments were constructed at this time. In 733 BC, Corinth established colonies at Corcyra and Syracuse. By 730 BC, Corinth emerged as a highly advanced Greek city with at least 5,000 people.
Aristotle tells the story of Philolaus of Corinth, a Bacchiad who was a lawgiver at Thebes. He became the lover of Diocles, the winner of the Olympic games. They both lived for the rest of their lives in Thebes. Their tombs were built near one another and Philolaus’ tomb points toward the Corinthian country while Diocles’ faces away.
In 657 BC the polemarch Cypselus obtained an oracle from Delphi which he interpreted to mean that he should rule the city. He seized power and exiled the Bacchiadae.

Additional information

Dimensions 7 x 7 x 8 cm